Contact Lens Exam FAQs

Your Spring, TX Eye Doctor Answers FAQs about Contact Lens Exams

Nearly 17 percent of U.S. adults wear contact lenses to improve their vision. With advanced technology and materials available to produce contacts, more and more people are choosing contact lenses to correct common refractive errors like nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. In addition, your Spring, TX optometrist offers specialty contacts for those with certain eye disorders such as keratoconus and dry eye who cannot wear regular soft contact lenses.

contact lens exam faqs from our optometrist in spring, tx

What is the Difference Between a Standard Eye Exam and a Contact Lens Exam?

After testing your vision, your eye doctor will measure your eyes' curvature and cornea to write a prescription for your contacts. Obtaining accurate measurements using state-of-the-art ophthalmological instruments is vital to providing you with contacts that fit comfortably and securely over your eyes. Contacts customized to fit your eyes also optimize vision improvement while supporting eye health.

Will I Need a Contact Lens Exam Every Year?

Everyone should have their eyes and vision evaluated annually by their eye doctor. This is especially important if you wear contacts. Ensuring your contact lens prescription conforms to your current visual and eye needs is essential for preventing future vision or eye problems.

Can I Wear Contacts If I am Severely Nearsighted or Have Astigmatism?

Of course! Your Spring, TX optometrist prescribes toric contacts for people with astigmatism that actually rotate while resting on your cornea to provide crisp, clear vision. In addition, contact lenses are available to accommodate high degrees of nearsightedness, even if you need correction over -10 diopters.

Does It Really Take a Week or More to Get Used to Wearing Contact Lenses?

For most people, no. After wearing soft contacts made with silicone hydrogel or hydrogel for two or three days, you shouldn't experience any discomfort since your eyes adjust quickly to soft contact materials. Hybrid contact lenses or rigid gas permeable contacts may take a little longer to get used because they are not as fully flexible as hydrogel contacts. People with astigmatism, presbyopia or keratoconus often need RGP contacts for vision improvement.

What are the Advantages of Daily Disposable Contacts?

Following a contact lens exam, your optometrist in Spring, TX may recommend daily disposable contacts or contacts that are worn once and discarded at the end of the day. In addition to their convenience, daily disposable contacts do not require care and help reduce the risk of eye irritation or infection.

Call Your Spring Optometrist Today!

For prompt eye care service and treatment, please contact your Spring optometrist today by calling (281) 601-1001 or (281) 719-9926. We look forward to seeing you!

New patients receive 20% OFF second complete pair of glasses.

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Monday:

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Tuesday:

9:00 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

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Thursday:

9:00 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

By Appt.

Sunday:

Closed

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